Feast of Pentecost

FEAST OF WEEKS

The Feast of Weeks, known today as the Day of Pentecost, is the fourth of the seven annual feasts of God in the Bible. As the seven feasts are grouped into three, the Day of Pentecost belongs to the second group of feasts together with Resurrection Day. The Day of Pentecost takes place 50 days after Resurrection Day. There are seven Sabbaths between the two feasts, hence their names.

“From the day after the Sabbath, the day you brought the sheaf of the wave offering [Day of Firstfruits], count off seven full weeks. Count off fifty days up to the day after the seventh Sabbath, and then present an offering of new grain to the Lord.”

Leviticus 23:15

Origin of the Feast of Weeks

The Feast of Weeks takes place on the 50th day after the Day of Firstfruits.

Forty days after crossing the Red Sea, Moses went up to Mount Sinai for the first time to receive instructions from God and deliver God’s will to the people. Ten days later (50 days after crossing the Red Sea), Moses returned to Mount Sinai and received the Ten Commandments from God (Ex 19:16-25).

God commanded the Israelites to commemorate the day when Moses went up Mount Sinai to receive the Ten Commandments as the Feast of Weeks. There were seven Sabbaths from the Day of Firstfruits when the Israelites came out of the Red Sea until the day Moses went up to Mount Sinai to receive the Ten Commandments.

“From the day after the Sabbath, the day you brought the sheaf of the wave offering, count off seven full weeks. Count off fifty days up to the day after the seventh Sabbath, and then present an offering of new grain to the Lord.”

Leviticus 23:15-16 (NIV)

This was the motivating power that spurred the growth of the Early Church as described in the book of Acts.
Origin of the Feast of Trumpets

After receiving the Ten Commandments from God, Moses descended Mount Sinai to rejoin the Israelites. Upon reaching the camp, Moses caught sight of the Israelites worshiping a golden calf, and became so furious he threw the stone tablets to the ground, breaking them to pieces.

The Israelites realized their wrongdoings and repented. God called Moses to Mount Sinai to give him a second set of stone tablets. Moses stayed on the mountain for another forty days and nights. But ten days before Moses returned to the camp, the Israelites prepared for his arrival by blowing trumpets and recalling their repentance. God commanded the Israelites to commemorate these ten days as the Feast of Trumpets and the day Moses finally came down the mountain as the Day of Atonement (Exodus 32-34).

Thus the heavens and the earth were completed in all their vast array. By the seventh day God had finished the work he had been doing; so on the seventh day he rested from all his work. Then God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, because on it he rested from all the work of creating that he had done.

Genesis 2:1-2

Once Jesus entered the Most Holy Place in heaven, He poured out the Holy Spirit on the disciples of the Early Church. This was the motivating power that spurred the growth of the Early Church as described in the book of Acts (Acts 2:1-47).

Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a sabbath to the LORD your God.

Exodus 20:8-10

Celebrating the Day of Pentecost

Just as the disciples celebrated the Day of Pentecost, today, the Church of God also celebrates the Day of the Pentecost and continues to grow exponentially, being moved by Holy Spirit.